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Digital inclusion: How Age UK Camden helps older people to connect

In the UK, 44% of people over 65 years old have never used a computer compared to 1% of young people aged between 16–24 years. The charity Age UK Camden in partnership with the London Borough of Camden provides computer and internet training services for older people to address this inequality. The training course provides support in using a computer, the internet and email, and has had positive results. This is highlighted by Joyce, a participant who believes “the course has given me the confidence to use computers and other new technology. My overall experience was positive. I got everything I wanted out of the course and more”. 

More information about this service can be found in the Governance International case study.


Paul Corrigan: How co-producing health can add the extra value needed to help save the NHS

“Co-production is the only way in which sufficient value can be created to ensure that the NHS leaves this decade in as thriving state as it entered it”.  Paul challenges the traditional idea that value is created in the NHS simply by medical staff, their kit and drugs, but instead highlights the value created by utilising resources from service users and communities. He believes a lot can be learnt from the NESTA People Powered Health Project.

Read Paul’s chapter in the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


John Jennings: Co-producing personalisation in Derbyshire

John Jennings is not just a person who uses social services, he works to change them. He founded the social enterprise Citizen Leaders to support citizens, enabling them to strongly influence social services. In particular, Citizen Leaders provides training for social workers on personalisation.  He has also co-produced a video on personalisation as part of his work with the Stakeholder Engagement Board of Derbyshire County Council.

John also contributed a chapter about his work in the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


Gerry Power: Policy drivers for co-production in health and social care in Scotland

In Scotland the Christie Commission argued for urgent reforms of public services to ensure that “our public services are built around people and communities, their needs, aspirations, capacities and skills, and work to build up their autonomy and resilience”. In driving co-production forward, the Scottish government has put ‘its money where its mouth is’ and set up several change funds to encourage service providers and commissioners to experiment with alternative service models.

Gerry Power, Co-Production and Community Capacity Lead of the Joint Improvement Team reports about his work with the 32 Scottish Partnerships to develop their responses to the Change Fund for ‘Reshaping Care for Older People’.

Read Gerry’s chapter the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


Cllr Ed Davie: The transformation of Lambeth into a Co-operative Council

Lambeth, the first co-operative council in England is at the “cutting edge of doing something really interesting and exciting” according to Cllr Ed Davie. It is giving more control directly to ordinary people so that they can influence all aspects of service delivery. This has resulted in services being more responsive to the community’s wishes so that they get what they want and need, rather than what the council perceives them to need.

Ed has written a chapter about this in the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


Helen Allen: How Community Catalysts support enterprising people

The social enterprise Community Catalysts harnesses the energies of entrepreneurial people, carers, families, citizens and the local authority, helping them to work together to effect change. For example, Community Catalysts supported Carita Smith to set up her own enterprise to provide a safe and fun environment for adults with a learning disability, physical disability or mental ill health. Members tell Carita what physical activity they would like to engage in and she commissions it for them. Tai chi, dancing, aerobics, cheerleading and Elvis dancing are just some of the selection of activities. Community Catalysts aim to create high quality and sustainable local services for local people. Service users are not labelled and confined to a certain category but their talents are valued so that they are able to provide a service to support others.

Read Helen’s chapter in the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


Jude Wells: How Stockport Council co-designed their adult social care website

Does your organisation design the information it provides for other people with the target groups concerned? This is what adult social care of Stockport Council did. The website 'My Care, My Choice' was re-designed with service users in order to provide information and advice ‘fit for people who use services’.  Not only has it been beneficial to service users but it has also resulted in significant efficiency savings, as it is estimated that £300,000 is being saved per annum. More information about this co-design project can be found in the Governance International case study by Jude Wells.

Jude has also contributed a chapter to the the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­.


Laura Wilkes: Taking co-production forward in local government

Laura talks about the challenges and opportunities for local government to take co-production further. In particular, she highlights the current risk aversion in local government, which is inhibiting co-production. A  Local Government Information Unit survey of local authority representatives undertaken in 2012 found that 85% of survey respondents agreed that community participation would create new risks for the organisation. This culture of risk aversion needs to change so that the benefits of co-production can be seen.

Read Laura’s chapter in the Governance International & LGiU book Making health and social care personal and local: From mass production to co-production­


From mass production to co-production: Why we need to use co-production on a major scale

This video blog provides different testimonials on why public service co-production is not just a nice thing to have but a necessity in the light of budgetary pressures and demographic changes. The video blogs includes interviews with Jude Wells (Stockport Council), David Morris (University of Central Lancashire), Helen Allen (Community Catalysts), David Taylor-Gooby (Durham Dales, Easington and Sedgefield CCG) and Elke Loeffler (Governance International). 

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